[HOME]

  1. Introduction
  2. Open Letter to the Board of Trustees
  3. University's Response to Open Letter
  4. Response to University
  5. YouTube Documentary
  6. Preuniversity Settlers
  7. Oakland Bill of Rights
  8. Declaration of Freedom
  9. Problems
  10. Solutions
  11. Actions
  12. UPMC
  13. PITT
    SempleFest
  14. Jul. '09
  15. Aug. '09
  16. Sept. '09
  17. Oct. '09
  18. Origin of SOUL
  19. WPXI - Group talks trash
  20. National Disgrace
  21. Gratitude
  22. Support Letters
  23. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  24. Pittsburgh City Paper
  25. Media - Broken Trust?
  26. Feb. '10
  27. Jun. '10
  28. Done Deal?
  29. Mayor's Reply
  30. Pitt Fireworks
  31. Pitt Fireworks
  32. Pitt Fireworks
  33. Aug. '10
  34. Sep. '10
  35. Letter to Legislators
  36. Letter to Chancellor
  37. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  38. A Call for Compassion
  39. WPXI Coverage
  40. Human Dignity
  41. Letter to the Editor
  42. SempleFest
  43. Request for Apology
  44. The Shame of a University
  45. Firebombs Must End
  46. Call To Action
  47. Fireworks Press Release
  48. Shadow on the Lawn
  49. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Article
  50. Right-to-Know Law Testimony
  51. University Impact Aid Law
  52. Proposal University Impact Aid Law
  53. Nordenberg Must Resign
  54. Allegheny County Council Testimony
  55. Time for New Leadership Message
  56. Time for New Leadership Testimony
  57. Class-Action Lawsuit?
  58. Nordenberg Must Resign Paid Message
  59. Time for A New Beginning
  60. Letter to the Editor
  61. Letter to the Editor
  62. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  63. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article
  64. A New Paradigm
  65. In Memoriam: Robert "Bob" Casciato
  66. Symbol of Domination
  67. Revised University Impact Aid Proposal
  68. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  69. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  70. Community Objectives
  71. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  72. City Planning Commission Testimonies
  73. Letter to Chancellor Patrick Gallagher
  74. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  75. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  76. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  77. End The Shame
  78. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  79. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  80. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  81. Decimation of an Urban Community
 
Enough Is Enough! Trashed street photo.

[HOME]

  1. Introduction
  2. Open Letter to the Board of Trustees
  3. University's Response to Open Letter
  4. Response to University
  5. YouTube Documentary
  6. Preuniversity Settlers
  7. Oakland Bill of Rights
  8. Declaration of Freedom
  9. Problems
  10. Solutions
  11. Actions
  12. UPMC
  13. PITT
    SempleFest
  14. Jul. '09
  15. Aug. '09
  16. Sept. '09
  17. Oct. '09
  18. Origin of SOUL
  19. WPXI - Group talks trash
  20. National Disgrace
  21. Gratitude
  22. Support Letters
  23. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  24. Pittsburgh City Paper
  25. Media - Broken Trust?
  26. Feb. '10
  27. Jun. '10
  28. Done Deal?
  29. Mayor's Reply
  30. Pitt Fireworks
  31. Pitt Fireworks
  32. Pitt Fireworks
  33. Aug. '10
  34. Sep. '10
  35. Letter to Legislators
  36. Letter to Chancellor
  37. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
  38. A Call for Compassion
  39. WPXI Coverage
  40. Human Dignity
  41. Letter to the Editor
  42. SempleFest
  43. Request for Apology
  44. The Shame of a University
  45. Firebombs Must End
  46. Call To Action
  47. Fireworks Press Release
  48. Shadow on the Lawn
  49. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Article
  50. Right-to-Know Law Testimony
  51. University Impact Aid Law
  52. Proposal University Impact Aid Law
  53. Nordenberg Must Resign
  54. Allegheny County Council Testimony
  55. Time for New Leadership Message
  56. Time for New Leadership Testimony
  57. Class-Action Lawsuit?
  58. Nordenberg Must Resign Paid Message
  59. Time for A New Beginning
  60. Letter to the Editor
  61. Letter to the Editor
  62. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  63. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article
  64. A New Paradigm
  65. In Memoriam: Robert "Bob" Casciato
  66. Symbol of Domination
  67. Revised University Impact Aid Proposal
  68. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  69. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  70. Community Objectives
  71. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  72. City Planning Commission Testimonies
  73. Letter to Chancellor Patrick Gallagher
  74. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  75. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  76. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  77. End The Shame
  78. Pittsburgh City Council Testimony
  79. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  80. Letter to Chancellor Gallagher
  81. Decimation of an Urban Community

Revised University
Impact Aid Law Proposal

The following was sent to political leaders and
leaders of community organizations on May 7, 2014.

Attached is a revised proposal for a University Impact Aid law. The initial proposal was sent to community organizations and political leaders in September 2012.

This proposed law will generate approximately $2.5 million dollars for communities that are impacted by a university's presence, thereby giving these communities the opportunity to gain greater control of their own destinies. It will allow these communities to reduce reliance on city government to resolve their problems, and will result in greater availability of city of Pittsburgh funds to assist communities that are not severely impacted by a university's presence.

The law will also allow these communities to rely less on funding from nonprofit organizations. Communities will have greater freedom to make their own choices and not have to fear loss of funding from nonprofits, such as UPMC, should they take a policy position that is different from those organizations' own positions. Nonprofit organizations may still contribute to these communities, but it will be done so without conditions.

Enactment of this proposal into law would provide sufficient funds in order that community organizations such as the Oakland Planning and Development Corporation would not have the arduous task of applying for a $20,000 yearly grant from the Liquor Control Board to combat the ever-increasing student binge drinking problems in their communities. Additionally, grassroots movements would not have to be told to start a Neighborhood Improvement District when asking a university for the equivalent of $4 from a student's tuition fee to end the daily litter and trash problems.

The proposed law will assess a fee of $50 for each undergraduate and graduate student of the named universities. This should not pose a hardship on the students or the university, and any opposition by students or universities could be overcome. During his tenure, Pitt Chancellor Mark Nordenberg raised in-state tuition by $10, 936 and out-of-state tuition by $14,178. This massive increase did not harm the university, and its student enrollment even increased.

The belief that what is good for universities is also good for the communities and city of Pittsburgh is faulty at best. For that belief to be true, one also must believe that longtime residents of a community who have been impacted by a university's presence are meaningless and of no consequence. Communities impacted by universities have to be constantly vigilant to hold on to their identities, and even to survive. A developer recently made an inquiry to purchase 18 parcels of properties in the Panther Hollow neighborhood. The developer's intention was to turn these properties into student housing for the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University. The developer's goal could have led to the destruction of one of Pittsburgh's first Italian neighborhoods. Fortunately the response from the property owners, many of whom are supporters of our grassroots movement, was unanimous. They said enough is enough, no more expansion in our neighborhood. Other community organizations, residents, and political leaders can bolster ther sentiment by strongly supporting this proposal.

Unlike the federal government, which upholds its responsibilities by providing millions of dollars in funding to school districts that are severely impacted by the large presence of military families, university administrators in Pittsburgh communities do not take full responsibility or provide sufficient funding to communities burdened by the presence of their universities. Our grassroots movement continues to believe that a new paradigm is emerging (Link 67 at www.oaklanddignity.com), and that passage of the attached proposal into law will create a new beginning for communities that are severely impacted by a university's presence.

We are asking Councilman Bruce Kraus, Councilman Daniel Gilman and Councilman R. Daniel Lavelle to spearhead enactment of this proposal into law.

Carlino Giampolo

The following is the attachment

Revised University
Impact Aid Law Proposal

This law would provide funding to communities impacted by a university’s presence.

One example of tuition increases by a university: Since 1997, how much has Pitt Chancellor Mark Nordenberg increased tuition per academic year for undergraduate, full-time students in the School of Arts and Sciences?

In 1997, tuition for in-state students cost $6,164. In 2013, tuition for in-state students cost $17,100. That is a total increase of $10,936 per student.

In 1997, tuition for out-of-state students cost $12,928. In 2013, tuition for out-of-state students cost $27,106. That is a total increase of $14,178 per student.

What amount of funding must a university provide for a community?

$50 for each full-time undergraduate and graduate student enrolled at the university.

What communities in Pittsburgh are most impacted by a university’s presence in or near their community?

The communities of Oakland, South Side, Shadyside, Squirrel Hill and Bloomfield are most impacted because of the presence of universities in or near their communities.

How are communities affected by a university’s presence?

1) There is a tremendous burden placed upon long-time residents which includes having to deal with binge drinking problems, including illegal alcohol sales conducted by students in the community.

2) Inordinate litter and trash problems

3) Long-time residents experience disrespect, intimidation, and fear of retaliation by students after reporting problems to the police.

4) The mental health of long-time residents is endangered because of living with the anxiety and stress caused by the actions of disorderly students, especially during the late night hours when such residents are awakened from their sleep by the noise from student drinking parties.

5) Traffic problems

6) Parking problems

7) Universities purchase large pieces of property in the community for their own use without benefit to the community.

8) Long-time resident population decreases as student population increases, thereby changing the character of the community.

What universities in Pittsburgh most impact a community?

Approximate number of full-time undergraduate and graduate students

University of Pittsburgh
24,600
Carnegie Mellon University
10,900
Duquesne University
9,300
Point Park University
2,600
Chatham University
2,200
Carlow University
1,700

Why is such a law necessary?

This law is necessary:

1) To ease the hardship of those long-time residents affected by the presence of a university in or near their community.

2) Because university administrators have a responsibility and moral obligation to address the special challenges of long-time residents who are affected by the presence of the university.

3) Because communities cannot force university administrators to provide adequate funding to resolve community problems caused by a university’s presence.

4) When university administrators do not adequately provide for a safe and clean environment for long-time residents in their community.

5) When university administrators are consciously indifferent to satisfying the needs of a community which is impacted by the presence of their university.

6) To compel university administrators to provide general aid to a community for resolving those problems caused by a university’s presence.

What are the criteria to determine if a university falls under this law?

(Two criteria are sufficient)

A university has an enrollment of more than 1,000 full-time undergraduate and graduate students, excluding online students.

A university has ownership of more than 10 buildings within a community.

A university has more than 200 students living within a residential community.

A university’s main campus lies within the city of Pittsburgh.

Who receives the money allocated from a university?

The funding would be earmarked “restricted” and would go to one umbrella charity organization such as the United Way or The Pittsburgh Foundation which would dispense the funds to the communities.

All residential organizations within a community will be eligible to receive the funding.

What are a few of the projects that a community can employ with its university impact aid money?

1) Funding for a daily maintenance litter program.

2) Funding for a full-time city environmental enforcement officer.

3) Funding for workers to patrol a community Thursday through Sunday from 9pm to 1am who would report drinking problems to the police, thus removing the burden and danger for long-time residents of having to face retaliation from students for reporting such problems.

4) Funding for beautification projects.

5) Funding for staff workers of residential organizations to carry out the solutions for resolving the problems caused by the impact of a university’s presence in or near their community.

Carlino Giampolo

 

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